Tag Archives: HF

FlexRadio Systems PowerGenius XL Full Legal Limit Amplifier

powergeniusxl
FlexRadio Systems has introduced their PowerGenius XL HF amplifier.

You can see Gerald Youngblood K5SDR tell you about this amazing product here.

The PowerGenius XL is a 100% duty cycle, legal limit (1500W ICAS) 1.8-54 MHz RF amplifier intended for both amateur and government use.  It incorporates a pair of modern NXP 1K5H LDMOS transistors that are individually capable of 1.5 kW thus providing plenty of headroom for lowest IMD and spurious output. Efficiency and spurious performance are also enhanced through the use of diplexed filters.

Multiple band selection methods are supported including CAT, CI-V, BCD band decode and Ethernet.  When connected to a FLEX-6000 transceiver, band selection is fully automated through the Ethernet connection.  Even T/R control is provided over the Ethernet connection to further minimize wiring. In addition, all amplifier status reporting including power levels, fault conditions and resets are reported to the FLEX-6000 Signature Series transceiver using the SmartSDR API.  SmartSDR client interfaces such as SmartSDR for Windows, Maestro and others can display power levels and other reported statuses.

For remote operation with other HF radio exciters, an Ethernet API or friendly Windows and Android applications can control the PowerGenius XL. For contest operation, the PowerGenius XL is SO2R capable with two inputs and two outputs for two sources and antennas and the rapid band switching eliminates the need for two amplifiers. A single FLEX-6700 and PowerGenius XL comprises a complete SO2R station at half the cost of competing solutions.

The Power Genius XL amplifier will be priced competitively with specific pricing and availability announced after FCC and CE certification has been achieved. Power Genius XL will be packaged to complement FlexRadio’s FLEX-6000 Signature Series transceivers.

SPECIFICATIONS

PA Specifications

  • RF Power Output: 1500W (ICAS)
  • Exciter Drive Level: 50W
  • Transistors: NXP 1K5H x 2
  • Exciter Inputs:1 SO-239 x 2
  • Antenna Outputs: SO-239 x 2
  • Antenna Impedance (w/o tuner): 50 Ohm Unbalanced
  • Cooling: Thermostatically controlled fans

Mechanical

  • Height: 5″ (13 cm)
  • Width: 13″ (33 cm)
  • Depth: 17″ (43 cm)
  • Weight: 33 lbs (15 kgs)
  • Operating Temperature Range: TBD

Electrical

  • Input Voltage:2 90 – 250VAC, 50/60 Hz
  • Power Supply: Modular internal switching

Specifications subject to change without notice.
1-SO2R configuration
2-Maximum RF power output achieved using 220 VAC

I Would Like to Get an HF Antenna for my Home – Part 1

We have heard this numerous times from our Amateur Radio customers. Whether you are just starting out, or an oldtimer who has been hamming for years – and everyone in between – this is a fairly complicated and in depth subject.

What does an antenna do ?
This is what radiates your signal out to the world. This is the most critical part of any amateur radio station. If you are going to cut corners or save some of the budget, this is NOT the part to do it on.

So how do you select the correct antenna, when there are so many to choose from ?

Let’s look at the types of antennas available.

A Vertical antenna for HF

Verticals – Basic, can be single or multi band. Relatively inexpensive as well. Should be ground mounted with ground radials installed, which is what turns most people away from this type of antenna. An absolute minimum of 4 radials are required, but don’t expect huge results. Typically 32 or more should be installed, on the ground (they will settle in and disappear over time) or you bury them yourself.
Ground mounted verticals are good for DX because of their low angle of radiation.

The same vertical can also be installed on a roof or tower, but they require some form of counterpoise system. This is typically accomplished by hanging the  radials from the base of the antenna. A good example would be installing the antenna on a roof, and laying the radials across the roof.

Radials always connect to the base of the antenna , and are run outward in equal divisions, much like the spokes of a wheel.

Here is a typical vertical antenna: https://radioworld.ca/but-hf6v
You can add some options or homebrew your own.
This radial kit by DX Engineering includes radial wire, fasteners, and “staples” to staple the radials to the ground. The staples will decompose naturally on their own.
DX Engineering also manufactures a base plate for mounting the vertical to a post, and then securing the radials to the plate.

Radioworld sells verticals by Butternut, Comet, Cushcraft, DX Engineering, Hustler, Hy-Gain, and MFJ.
Some are single band, two band, or multiband up to 9 bands. In general, the more bands that the antenna covers, or the smaller an antenna is, the more of a compromise the antenna is. Where most multiband antennas employ coils and/or traps to allow extra bands, antennas like this 43 foot vertical from DX Engineering use no coils or traps, but utilises a remote tuner (sold separately)  at the base of the antenna. And you still need those radials.

Then, there are vertical antennas that employ a matching network on the antenna, with a few very short radials at the base of the antenna. These are much better for tower or roof mounting, as you don’t have wire radials hanging and drooping down, and looking messy. This is again a compromise antenna, but they do work reasonably well. Typically they cost 1.5 – 2 times more than a ground mounted vertical.
Here is an example of a multiband vertical with a matching network.

Vertical antennas are very popular due to their reasonable cost, multiband coverage and ease of installation. They are ideal for small lot sizes. They offer a uniform radiation pattern, but tend to be noisier than horizontally polarised antennas. Yes, you can work DX, but you’ll be blending in with everyone else when you’re calling that rare one.
And be sure to keep an open mind – this CB antenna covers 10, 11, 12 and 15 metres, and requires no radials.

Wire AntennasWire Antennas – The easiest and least expensive of HF antennas. You can purchase commercially made and pre-tuned single, or multiband wire antennas, or build your own. Typically wire antennas are configured as dipole or inverted V styles, but can also be slopers, inverted L’s, long wire or various other styles.

Some popular wire antennas, like the G5RV, require a matching network (tuner) to work properly. This would also apply to non-resonant antennas like longwires, inverted L’s and slopers.

Because of their low cost, low profile, low maintenance and decent performance, many hams build their own wire antennas. You can build everything yourself, or use some commercially made parts like this inexpensive centre and end insulator kit. Add your own wire, special dacron rope to tie off the insulators, and feedline (cable), and you’re all set !

Beams, or directional antennas, are a step up from the others. These antennas direct the signal in one direction, and reject signals from other directions. They are basically a dipole antenna with reflective and directive elements added on to a common boom. They can be for single bands or for multiple bands, but because of their size do not (usually) cover lower frequencies.

A single element antenna is a dipole. The signal radiates from the sides, but not the ends. Adding a director(s)  and a reflector(s) alters the radiation pattern into one direction. The more “elements” (director/reflector elements) the more gain an antenna will have, in one direction. The antenna is aimed at the station you wish to contact. This is done with a rotator on the tower, accessed from a control box at the operators station.

Here is a three element beam for 10, 15 and 20 metres th3-mk4

In this picture, the signal is aimed to the left. The centre element, called the driven element, radiates the signal. The element on the right (the reflector), reflects the signal to the left. The leftmost element (the director) directs the signal to the left. Directors are physically shorter than the driven element, whilst the reflector is physically longer than the driven element. And there is plenty of math to calculate all those dimensions.

Beams can be quite large, and usually need to be supported by a tower. Some smaller beams can be mounted on smaller structures, like tripods or stand alone masts.

Here is an example of an extremely large antenna system20mbeam

Like any antenna, the higher up it is mounted, the better it will perform.

To the left is a 5 element beam for 20 metres, on a 78 foot tower. Quite expensive, it requires some serious work to put up, but will give a really big signal.

 

 

 

So when customers come in saying they want an antenna for HF and what do we recommend, it really isn’t an easy answer. We have to ask many questions to find what works for you.

Come on in and let’s talk.

Tim VA3FU
WAC, WAS, DXCC

Kenwood TS-990 pricing announced, available soon!!

Kenwood’s Flagship Radio!! pricing has been announced!!

NOW ON DISPLAY AT RADIOWORLD !

 

Soon to be available from Radioworld the announced price is $8000.00, supplies will be limited so please order now if you are wanting the latested in HF technology.

Click on this link for the latest brochure on this world class transceiver.

kents990s200W 160-6M HF Base Transceiver

The TS-990S comes equipped with dual receivers for simultaneous reception on different bands, it also features narrow-band roofing filters on the main receiver in a full down-conversion configuration. The TS-990S achieves the highest basic reception performance of any radio in the TS series, through the careful selection of circuits, components and accelerating analysis using triple DSP configuration. Also, thanks to the dual TFT display and superior panel layout, it achieves both comfortable visibility and operability. Our top-of-the-line transceiver is for all radio operators who love HF.

The transceiver uses the down-conversion method on all amateur bands, and features five types of High-IP roofing filter. Narrow bandpass widths selectable are 500 Hz and 270 Hz for CW operation, 2.7 kHz for SSB and 6 kHz and 15 kHz, which are suitable for AM/FM. These filters are automatically selected in tandem with DSP-based settings. Of course, manual switching is possible as well.

The standard equipment includes a TCXO (Temperature- Compensated Crystal Oscillator), which stabilizes frequencies at ±0.1 ppm as the standard signal source. Unlike OCXO (Oven Controlled Crystal Oscillator), which requires warm-up time, this device can start up quickly even from the power-off position, while maintaining a high level of stability. It is in compliance with European energy-saving standard Lot 6. Power consumption in stand-by energy-saving mode is less than 0.5 W. A BNC connector on the rear panel provides 10 MHz reference I/O.

The sub-receiver utilizes the same receiver found on the popular TS-590S transceiver!!

Leo

The Flex Insider – It’s Q4. Where’s My Radio?

A Word from the CEO

I am sure some of you are asking that question so we wanted to provide the answer. The short version is that units will begin shipping to our beta team in November with general availability units to follow in the first quarter.   A more detailed explanation of the reasoning is as follows:

In development of the FLEX-6000 Signature Series, we have consistently assumed the position that it is more important to do things right the first time than to take shortcuts. Many times in software development there are design decisions where one can choose to quickly “hard code” for the short term rather than to take the time to architect a long term solution or “framework.” We have simply made the decision to architect a solid framework so that we deliver a product that will last for years to come.

While the FLEX-6000 Series resembles radio architectures FlexRadio currently delivers to its government customers, the new transceivers are unlike any other commercial amateur radio products on the market. Though we are leveraging the work we did for our commercial customers and have redirected our resources from this project to our amateur project, we are not duplicating it, hence the additional development time. Think of the FLEX-6000 Series as a “platform” for delivering radio applications. Some of those applications are obvious and some of the most interesting are not so obvious. When building a platform, it is important not only to implement the common use cases but to plan for the future ones as well.

So where are we? We are currently developing on four parallel paths: FPGA Digital Signal Processing (DSP), radio software/Application Programming Interface (API) for the business logic and base-band DSP, Graphical User Interface development (GUI), and GUI integration to the radio API. We are also performing a detailed use case analysis to make sure we have covered all the bases in the design.

Most of the major component modules and the GUI framework are in place and we have begun integration of the GUI with the radio’s network API. We are streaming real signals over the network to real spectral displays running on the real GUI with real audio playing through the speaker. We are hard at work to complete integration and testing and are focusing on completing the coding of the various use cases.

On the hardware front, our contract manufacturing partner, Austin Manufacturing Services (AMS), is in the process of building pre-production radios. Pre-production is where you build production ready hardware in low volume to work out any production kinks. We expect this process to be completed during the month of November. Assuming all goes well in testing the pre-production units, we will be prepared to release and ramp production volumes when the software is ready.

Our team is highly motivated and working hard toward the goal of delivering a radio that you will enjoy and be proud to own for many years. We also want it to be a radio that we are proud to deliver. That is why we call it the “Signature Series.” Thank you for placing your confidence in FlexRadio and for extending your patience while we bring you the best radio we know how to provide.

73,
Gerald Youngblood, K5SDR President & CEO

New Product Announcements from Yeasu

The new FT1D Digital Portable Transceiver is the first Amateur Radio Dual Band Digital/Analog Transceiver employing advanced C4FM FDMA digital technology that opens the door for thrilling entirely new digital communication features. A new era of Digital Communications in Amateur Radio begins NOW with the introduction of the Yaesu FT1D Handheld Transceiver.

For more info on the FT1D click on the following 2 links

Page 1      Page 2

The new FT DX 3000 HF+50 MHz 100 Watt Transceiver is another excited new product that is certain to capture the hearts of determined DXers and Contesters as well as Casual operators looking for solid communications. Using the newest down conversion and sharp edged crystal roofing filter technology, this fabulous radio attains outstanding receiver performance inherited from Amateur Radio’s leading HF radio; our proud FTDX5000. The market has been waiting for a reasonably priced transceiver that takes a major performance leap forward – the FT DX 3000 is that feature filled compact radio package.

For more info on the FTDX-3000 please click here

 

 

 

Leo